Technion among world’s top 100 universities

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Technion among world’s top 100 universities

The Shanghai Ranking, which ranks the world’s leading academic institutions, places Technion 94th in the world

Haifa, Israel – August 16, 2021 – The Technion is 94th on a list of the world’s top 100 universities, according to a report published yesterday by Shanghai Ranking, the world’s leading index for higher education. The Technion – Israel Institute of Technology is also on the top 50 list in two fields: aerospace engineering (16th place) and automation & control (46th place). In chemistry, the Technion ranks among the top 50-75 universities in the world. The Technion has consistently made the top 100 list of the Shanghai Ranking since 2012 (with one exception in 2020).

“The Technion is one of the world’s leading universities, and we will continue to invest efforts and resources to maintain this position for years to come,” said Technion President Prof. Uri Sivan. “The Technion’s strength lies in its excellent human capital, which leads to numerous achievements and breakthroughs in research and teaching. This is the result of hard work and dedication by Technion faculty, deans, administrative staff, and management.”

Prof. Sivan added that the Technion’s listing on the Shanghai Ranking and other indices “is not a purpose on its own. Global academic competition is rapidly intensifying, and while many governments around the world are steadily increasing their investments in academia and research, Israeli universities rely almost entirely on donations, which are becoming increasingly difficult to get.”

According to Prof. Sivan, “in order for Israel to preserve its standing at the forefront of global research, and to ensure the nation’s security, as well as its academic and economic future, the government should significantly increase investment in research and teaching, as well as adopt a welcoming stance toward the absorption of foreign faculty and students.”

While Prof. Sivan is “pleased that the Technion is among the three Israeli academic institutions on the top 100 list, we must remember that without government support and globalization of our research institutions, it will be harder for us to maintain this position.”

The Shanghai Ranking, first published in 2003, categorizes academic institutions according to objective criteria, such as the number of Nobel Prize laureates and other prestigious awards; the number of scientific articles published in the leading journals Nature and Science; the number of times scientific articles published by university researchers have been quoted; and researchers who’ve been frequently quoted in academic journals, relative to their peers in the field.

The index looks at 1,800 universities, from which the top 1000 are selected. Leading the list are Harvard University, Stanford University, University of Cambridge, MIT and UC Berkeley.

Letter from Uri Sivan, President Technion – Israel Institute ofTechnology Click Here

For the full ranking, click here.

Celebrating 50 Years in Architecture

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Celebrating 50 years in Architecture

Aviva and Andrew Goldenberg receiving their honorary doctorates at the Technion

It has been 50 years since esteemed alumna, Aviva Goldenberg, graduated from the Technion’s Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning in 1971. This summer, a special reunion was organized in Israel for the graduates to celebrate this meaningful milestone.

Although Aviva was not able to attend the event, the Faculty has remained close to her heart over the past 50 years. Aviva and her husband, Dr. Andrew Goldenberg, are both accomplished entrepreneurs and avid supporters of Technion and the State of Israel. Aviva founded her own architectural firm while Andrew, a Technion grad from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, is a renowned expert in the field of robotics whose career combined both academia (at the University of Toronto) and industry.

Responding to the reunion invitation, Aviva shared that she and Andrew had gratefully and proudly funded the newly established Dr. Andrew & Aviva Goldenberg Architecture Studio Pavilion at the Technion. The donation expresses their thanks and appreciation to the Technion for providing them both with tools for successful and rewarding careers. Moreover, the Technion is the place where the couple met for the first time in December 1967.

Dr. Andrew & Aviva Goldenberg Architecture Studio Pavilion

The news of the new building from their fellow Faculty graduate was warmly and excitedly received by Aviva’s classmates, who were thrilled that Israel’s future architects will be learning and working in a beautiful, state of the art facility.

In recognition of their outstanding commitment to the Technion, Aviva and Andrew were awarded honorary doctorates in 2018, and Andrew was recently appointed to the Technion’s International Board of Governors.

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Cancer Breakthroughs from Technion

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WORLD CANCER DAY

Technion researchers and alumni are revolutionizing diagnostics and treatments for cancer patients around the world. Less invasive testing, targeted therapies and personalized treatment options will maximize health outcomes for those living with cancer.  February 4th is World Cancer Day and we are proud to share the most recent cancer breakthroughs from the Technion.

DESTROYING BRAIN TUMOURS

Technion alumni-founded Insightec is partnering with California-based SonALAsense and the Ivy Brain Tumor Center in Arizona to test a promising non-invasive treatment to effectively and safely destroy deadly brain tumors. Insightec founder and vice chairman of the board Dr. Kobi Vortman is a Technion alumnus.

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PRECISION CANCER TREATMENT

Nobel Laureate and Technion Distinguished Professor Aaron Ciechanover discusses Israeli startup OncoHost’s PROphet system, which combines life-science research and advanced machine-learning technology to develop personalized strategies to maximize the success of cancer therapy. OncoHost was founded in 2017 following more than a decade of academic research led by chief scientific adviser Technion Professor Yuval Shaked, head of the Rappaport Technion Integrated Cancer Center. Prof. Ciechanover is also on OncoHost’s board of scientific directors.

 

NOVOCURE’S VALUE RISES ON THE NYSE

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Novocure, whose FDA-approved Optune system is used for treating glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer, now has the highest valuation of any Israeli health care company on the New York Stock Exchange. The product was approved by Israel in 2020 for the treatment of mesothelioma, a rare lung cancer caused by asbestos. According to the company, the technology could also theoretically be effective in treating pancreatic, ovarian, lung and other difficult to treat cancer types. Novocure was founded in 2000 by Technion Professor emeritus Yoram Palti.

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MORE ACCURATE RADIOLOGY 

Co-Founder and CTO Yitzi Pfeffer and Aviel Blumenfeld, CEO, at IMedis Medical.

Israeli medical system company IMedis has received approval from the EU for its AI-based quality control system for radiology departments. The system can accurately identify findings that would require follow-ups and may have been missed by the radiologist in an initial reading, and help discover early findings without symptoms that could lead to cancer. IMedis Medical CEO and Co-founder Aviel Blumenfeld is a Technion alumnus.

 

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CANCER SENSING TOILET SEAT

An early screening unit that uses AI , computer vision algorithms, and multispectral optical sensors might one day help prevent many of the 700,000 yearly global deaths from colorectal cancer. The OutSense IoT sensor clips onto the toilet and operates automatically, non-invasively, discreetly and without active user intervention. The sensor “knows” who is sitting on the toilet based on the closest smartphone, as well as other ways to identify the user. Real-time analysis is conducted in the cloud, and notification of any abnormal results is sent immediately to the smartphone of the user or caregiver. OutSense Chairman and Founder Ishay Attar is a Technion alumnus.

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BETTER BIOPSIES

Limaca Medical says it has developed a medical device to perform endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies that promise 'ten times' greater procedural efficiency (Courtesy)

Israeli startup Limaca Medical has developed a medical device to perform endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsies that promise “ten times” greater procedural efficiency with less trauma than the commonly used endoscope. Limaca’s Precision biopsy device gives surgeons more control and enables them to precisely reach the area of interest in the organ and offers a vast improvement over current EUS methods. Limaca Founder and Medical Director Iyad Khamasi is an assistant professor at the Technion, and the director of the Invasive Endoscopy Unit at the Rambam Health Care Campus.

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Virtual Gala – Real Success!

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MERCI!

Technion Canada’s Virtual Gala was a huge success!  

Thank you to our wonderful community for their support!

With over 200 households in attendance, we surpassed our goal of raising $250,000 in support of the Andrew & Aviva Goldenberg Architecture Studio Pavilion at the Technion, and local Canadian initiatives.  Honourees Irwin & Sara Tauben were feted for their exemplary volunteerism, leadership & philanthropy and keynote speaker Moshe Safdie spoke about his internationally renowned career and his personal ties to Technion.

Please click here for more information and a list of our sponsors.

Watch a video showing the highlights of Technion and hear from Technion students!

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Irwin & Sara Tauben, Event Honourees
Keynote Speaker Moshe Safdie

FLYING CARS

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After selling his first aviation company, Rafi Yoeli had time to ponder his next move. He’d already served in the Israeli Air Force, earned two Technion graduate degrees as well as a pilot’s license, and had worked at Boeing and Israel Aircraft Industries, where he was one of the chief designers of the Lavi Fighter Jet.

What did he land on? The flying car.

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Eduardo Guendelman

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EDUARDO GUENDELMAN

Grad Year:             1974                                                                                                                                                           
Faculty/Degree:
    Electrical Engineering                                                                                                                               
Current Location:
Toronto, Canada

Professional Highlights:   My career has been incredibly diverse and exciting. After completing engineering studies at the Technion and a nine-year-long service as an officer with the Israeli Air Force, I become a serial entrepreneur. As such, I built more than a dozen tech companies. In 1984 I pioneered the speech recognition industry, which brought me to Canada to serve as an Executive VP of Magna International.  Later, in 1999, I built a company that I took public in Nasdaq that invented and produced the world's first hand-held GPS navigation systems. Later, a company that developed and patented a tele-health technology used by the US military and the Veterans Administration.

Q & A

I made Aliyah from Chile in 1970 and went straight to Technion. At that time, the Israeli tech industry was at its early development stage, so I was lucky to live through the transformation from an agricultural driven economy into a Start-Up Nation with a rich tech ecosystem.

Technion provides excellent education, not only by teaching you technical knowledge but also by stimulating students to be creative and to think out of the box. This factor, plus the typical Jewish Chutzpah, molded me into an engineer/entrepreneur. In 1974, shortly after the Yom Kippur War, I joined the IAF, where I earned enormous responsibility and authority. With that in hand, I was able to develop ideas and deliver inventions that possibly saved lives.

When I was sent along with other engineers and pilots to the US in 1980 as part of the F16 project, I still remember how surprised our counterparts were when they saw that Israel sent young people for this project of significant magnitude and strategic importance. But that's the secret of Israel. At the military service, soldiers and officers get tasks and responsibilities requiring leadership and creativity at a very young age. As a result, these same people gain confidence that they incorporate and use throughout their lives.

Thanks to the Technion, I have been inspired to create technologies in multiple disciplines, including healthcare, life science, and others. The Jewish genes, the Chutzpah, plus the formal Technion education, and, in my case, the IAF formation helped me to become innovative and to participate in the buildup of the tech industry in Israel that nowadays drives the economy.

What is your message to anyone giving back to Technion or considering doing so?

Technion is not just another university. It’s a part of a tech ecosystem of the kind few countries have. It is an institution that forges engineers who are creative and productive, and entrepreneurs who shape the future. In summary -- Contributing to Technion can have a tremendous impact.

Technion Update: Advancements Against COVID-19

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Technion – Israel Institute of Technology is at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19. Researchers from 50 different labs are developing solutions including vaccine research and therapeutics, personal protective equipment, diagnostics, and assistive technologies for healthcare providers. Despite months of hardship and uncertainty, we have witnessed the power of unity and collaboration. 

“ICU ROOM OF THE FUTURE”

Israel’s Sheba Hospital recently unveiled what they call “the ICU room of the future”. It features many innovative technologies that were developed by Technion alumni including: AnyVision, Vocalis and CLEW Medical. This room maximizes care and comfort while minimizing risk to staff during the Coronavirus pandemic.

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UV LIGHT TO COMBAT COVID-19

Prof. Ido Kaminer

An international team of research scientists, including Prof. Ido Kaminer of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, advocate the use of ultraviolet light as a “particularly efficient, easily deployable, and economically affordable” way to inactivate the Coronavirus and reduce transmission in indoor spaces. Their findings were recently published in the journal ACS Nano.

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AN ALGORITHM TO IMPROVE COVID-19 TREATMENT

Assistant Prof. Joachim Behar

Assistant Prof. Joachim Behar, head of Technion’s Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, together with Master’s student Jeremy Levy and doctors from Rambam Health Care Campus, have developed a new set of tools to analyze the data collected by oximeters, which monitor oxygen saturation levels in a patient’s blood. Information gathered by oximeters monitoring patients with COVID-19 could help doctors predict deterioration in a patient’s condition.

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99% ACCURATE RAPID HOME TEST 

Prof. Naama Geva-Zatorsky & Team

Prof. Naama Geva-Zatorsky, of Technion’s Faculty of Medicine, is leading a team of researchers in the development of a home kit that would enable people to be quickly and inexpensively tested for the Coronavirus. Without elaborate lab equipment, it has a 99% accuracy rate based on 200 biological samples from patients affected by the virus. Today, her lab is working on improving its sensitivity for detection in low concentrations.

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SURVEILLING SEWERS FOR COVID-19

Using the Internet of Things (IoT), original algorithms, and artificial intelligence, Israeli startup Kando, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, and Ben-Gurion University have launched a pilot project to detect traces of the novel Coronavirus in the wastewater of Ashkelon. Kando allows experts to pinpoint specific areas affected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, enabling responses and potentially avoiding total lock-down in the event of a second wave of the Coronavirus.

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BOOSTING MASK EFFECTIVENESS

The unique “Maya” sticker is a 3D-printed sticker, developed by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, led by Prof. Eyal Zussman. The innovative sticker contains nanofibers coated with antiseptics. Stuck onto surgical masks, the team says the sticker significantly upgrades protection, and is able to capture and kill nano-particles of 99 percent of viruses from droplets that reach the mask.  The next step is mass production for hospitals and the public.

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POOLED TESTING ACCELERATES COVID-19 SCREENING

Researchers at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology announced a successful trial of pooling medical samples and performing simultaneous testing for the presence of the Coronavirus in batches of 32 or 64 samples at a time. Now, the test is undergoing final validation and it should be available for widespread use by winter, when the prevalence of other respiratory diseases will make rapid diagnosis of COVID-19 even more critical.

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DIAGNOSTICS ROBOTICS GOES GLOBAL

Diagnostic Robotics Ltd is an AI-based remote screening platform used by Israel to monitor the spread of COVID-19. It has now been deployed globally, including in the U.S., Western Europe, and Asia. Co-founders Jonathan Amir and Dr. Kira Radinsky, and Prof. Moshe Shoham are all Technion alumni. Prof. Shoham also teaches at Technion’s Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and heads the Kahn Medical Robotics Laboratory.

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CORTICA’S TOUCH-LESS TECH FOR A COVID-19 WORLD

Corsight, a subsidiary of the high-tech company Cortica, launched their touchless AI technology globally. Their high-speed AI facial recognition technology helps medical teams access locked areas without removing protective gear. Emerging from research at the Technion, Cortica was founded by Technion Prof. Yehoshua Zeevi and doctoral graduates, Igal Raichelgauz and Karina Ordinaev.

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Technion breakthroughs in COVID research and technologies have been a source of inspiration and hope throughout the pandemic. When you support the Technion       COVID-19 Emergency Research Fund, you contribute to the success stories that will help us overcome this health crisis as quickly as possible.

SUPPORT THE EMERGENCY RESEARCH FUND

In Heart Micro-computers

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Vectorius Medical’s V-LAP Left Atrial Filling Pressure Sensor, Image Credit: Vectorius Medical

TAKE HEART: Every year, millions of adults worldwide are diagnosed with heart failure. Vectorious’ V-LAP, the world’s first direct heart pressure monitor located on the heart’s left atrium, is allowing physicians to get unprecedented access to the earliest indication of heart pressure changes before the patient feels any symptoms, in order to manage the disease and to live a better life.

Vectorius co-founders, Oren Goldshtein and Dr. Eyal Orion, are both Technion Alumni.

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World Environment Day

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June 5th is World Environment Day, a day to reflect on what we can do protect the health of our planet. This year in particular, amidst the pandemic, we all have a heightened awareness of the ways in which our earth and human health are interconnected and must safeguarded.  Let’s all take this opportunity to become more environmentally responsible and mindful of the ways we can preserve nature today.

Here are a few ways Technion’s technological innovations encourage you to revisit your relationship with the world we live in.

ISRAEL AND USA JOIN FORCES FOR WATER-ENERGY TECH

Technion is part of a $21.4 million Israel-US consortium to develop water-energy technologies. More specifically, they are focusing on energy-efficient enhanced water supply, wastewater reuse and resource recovery, and energy water systems.

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THE FUTURE OF CLEAN ENERGY

PhD student Avigail Landman and Masters student Rawan Halabi are saving the planet with a water-splitting system powered by solar energy. This is a huge step towards eliminating our use of fossil fuels and lowering the damaging effects they have on our environment.

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MACHINE WHISPERERS TO SAVE THE PLANET

Augury is an Industrial Internet of Things and AI company which makes machines more reliable and enhances human productivity to  help reduce environmental impact. Also known as “machine whisperers”,  Augury co-founders Gal Shaul and Saar Yoskowitz are Technion alumni.

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WASTE CONVERSION TECH TO MAKE AUTO PARTS

German giant Daimler AG recently announced their collaboration with UBQ Materials to develop “clean” auto parts from converted unsorted household waste. UBQ Materials CTO Shaul Sheffer is a Technion alumnus.

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MONITORING THE ENVIRONMENT WITH BIOLOGICAL COMPUTER

Ph.D. student Natalia Barger and Assistant Professor Ramez Daniel, head of the Synthetic Biology and Bioelectronics Lab at Technion, designed a biological computer to monitor different substances in the environment. Constructed within a bacterial cell, it can transmit signals and can even warn about hemorrhaging in the human body in the future.

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EVERY DROP OF WATER COUNTS

Hydratech founder and CTO Dr. Dovik Barkay, is a Technion alumnus who started Hydrantech to create smart hydrant that saves water and millions of dollars. This smart hydrant alerts authorities of leaks, theft or malicious attempts to penetrate a water supply.

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FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE

Technion graduate Tomer Tzach started CropX in 2014.  The company is based on a hardware and software system that uses the power of big data, machine learning and cloud technology to boost agricultural output.  Their revolutionary system protects the environment by helping farmers save on water, fertilizer and energy while conserving resources.

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GIVE BEES A BREAK

Technion alumnus Eylam Ran is the Founder and CEO of agri-tech startup, Edete Precision. They have developed an innovative two-stage artificial pollination technology which mimics the way honeybees collect and distribute pollen. Now bees can take a break!

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MACHINE VISION ANALYZING WATER QUALITY

Mekorot and Newsight Imaging collaborated to develop an inexpensive spectrometer which can improve monitoring the quality of water and considerably increase efficiency. Co-founder and CTO of Newsight Imaging, Eval Yatskan, is a Technion alumnus.

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REMOTE SENSOR TO END OIL POLLUTION

Technion researchers are always trying to find innovative solutions to help save the planet. One of these solutions includes a remote sensor that can be placed on drones or satellites to produce high-resolution data on soil contaminants and detect oil leaks.

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Technion students, researchers and alumni are making big strides daily to help improve the state of the environment. If we all contribute by making one small change, together we can make a big impact. Be the difference the world needs. Support Technion Research helping make the world a better place.

SUPPORT THE TECHNION

Le génie médical au Technion

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Dr. David Bensoussan

Nous sommes fier de partager cette article, écrit par David Bensoussan, un ancien de Technion, qui examine les avances réalisé par les graduées et chercheurs du Technion. Présentée cette semaine dans Times of Israel.

Examine les nombreuses avances réalisées par les techniciens et les anciens.

We are proud to share this article written by Technion alumnus, David Bensoussan, which explores the medical advances achieved by Technion researchers and alumni.  Featured this week in the Times of Israel.  

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